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Technical Papers Authored or Co-authored By Dr.  Robert  H.  Badgley

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Order: #17

17. Cundiff, R. A. , Badgley, R. H. and Reddecliff, J. , "Design, Manufacture and Operation of a Dynamic Simulator for Testing Advanced Small Gas Turbine Engine Components, " presented at the Symposium on Propulsion System Structural Integration and Engine Integrity, Monterey, CA, September 6, 1974.

A rotor-bearing system has been designed and manufactured to be dynamically representative of an entire class of gas turbine engines: the two-spool front-drive, power-turbine engine, which is widely used in helicopter applications. The test rig configuration, with the addition of low-pressure compressor and fan simulator disks. would be dynamically representative of the turbojet and turbofan classes of engines, respectively. The simulator has been designed to permit developmental testing and evaluation of a number of advanced components and procedures. Among these are advanced intershaft bearings, rolling-element bearing dampers, and advanced balancing procedures. The apparatus has been utilized to date for initial evaluation of air-lubricated intershaft foil bearings, and for demonstration of an advanced balancing procedure. For these tests, the shaft was operated on elastically-mounted ball bearings without support damping over "a speed range encompassing two bending critical speeds. Rotor balancing via the recently-developed multiplane-multispeed balancing procedure was used to suppress both the first bending critical speed and a pedestal resonance, and to leave a'distinct vibration peak at 'the second bending critical speed. An air-lubricated inte"rshaft foil bearing of the hydrodynamic, resiliently-supported type proved to be capable of raising the second critical speed above the normal operating speed range of the power turbine shaft.

Order: #18

18.  Badgley, R. H. , "Implications of Multiplane-Multispeed Balancing for Future Turbine Engine Design and Cost, " SAE Paper No. 740865, presented at the Society of Automotive Engineers National Aerospace Engineering and Manufacturing Meeting, San Diego, California, October, 1-3, 1974.

ABSTRACT: This paper describes several alternative approaches, provided by multiplane-multispeed balancing, to traditional gas turbine engine manufacture and assembly procedures. These alternatives, which range from addition of trim-balancing at the end of the traditional assembly process to modular design of the rotating system for assembly and balancing external to the engine, require attention by the engine designer as an integral part of the design process. Since multiplane-multispeed balancing may be incorporated at one or more of several points during manufacture-assembly, its deliberate use is expected to provide significant cost and performance (reduced vibration) benefits. Moreover, its availability provides the designer with a firm base from which he may advance, with reasonable assurance of success, into the flexible rotor dynamic regime.

#19 not available

19. Gu, A. L. , Badgley, R. H. and Chiang, T. , "Planet-Pass-Induced Vibration in Planetary Reduction Gears, " ASME Paper No. 74-DET-93, presented at the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference, New York, NY, October 5-9, 1974.

Order: #20

20. Gu, A. L. and Badgley, R. H. , "Prediction of Vibration Sidebands in Gear Meshes, " ASME Paper No. 74-DET-95, presented at the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference, New York, NY, October 5-9, 1974.

A computer-implemented analysis has been established for predicting vibratron sidebands produced by variations in gear parameters, such as centerline distance, tooth transmitted force, and tooth support discontinuities for single gear mesh systems The sidebands are normally found at mesh frequency harmonics plus and minus inteqer multiples of the frequency of variation of the gear parameter. The sideband amplitudes depend on the magnitude of variation of the gear parameters. The vibration sideband spectra produced by spiral bevel gear shaft runout, externally imposed tooth mesh force variation, and a decrease in support stiffness over a number of consecutive ring gear teeth have been obtained for gear meshes in the CH-47 helicopter forward rotor drive transmission. This sideband analysis is useful both for designing low-vibration gear systems by properly controlling important gear pararneters and for identifving the existence of several types of gear problems, such as gear runout, drive train resonances, and tooth cracks.

#21 not available

21.  Darlow, M. S. and Badgley, R. H. , "Early Detection of Defects in Rolling Element Bearings, " presented at the Society of Automotive Engineers Automotive Engineering Congress and Exposition, Detroit, Michigan, February 26, 1975.

Order: #22

22.  Badgley, R. H. , "Implications of Multiplane-Multispeed Balancing for Future Turbine Engine Design and Cost, " SAE Paper No. 740865, presented at the Society of Automotive Engineers Automotive Engineering Congress and Exposition, Detroit, Michigan, February 26, 1975 (Re-presentation of paper No. 18 above at SAE request).

Order: #23

23.  Weinert, E. P. and Badgley, R. H. , "Down With Vibration.   Lateral Vibration in Gas Turbines: Let's Lower It Now, " Gas Turbine International, Vol. 16, No. 1, January-February 1975, p. 58.

Lateral vibration in gas turbines is too high -It's responsible for excessive downtime, forced outages and high corrective maintenance costs. Let's lower it now.

Gas turbine engines are widely used throughout the world. On land, at sea, and in the air they deliver promised performance without fanfare. In some applications they have no peer: in remote locations, severe environments where high horsepower is needed, and for aircraft propulsion, they have no equal.

As gas turbine engine experience grows, the user sees that high availability could be made higher and corrective maintenance cost lower by reducing frequency and severity of interruptions caused or aggravated by lateral vibration. No user nor type of engine design is immune. !, 2 No matter where it occurs - §enerating electric power, 3 performing in process industries, propelling ships, s pumping petroleum crude, natural gas, and refined products, dredging pipe trenches and driving aircraft6 - vibration related shutdown is always unwelcome and failure, costly.

Until a user is able to reflect on enough experience of his own, or that of others having similar engines performing the same function, he has very limited perspective. But experience is available to most if they seek it. It points out, in many ways, that vibration is higher than necessary and the percentage of problems, so caused or aggravated, is too large! Remedial measures with existing engines can lower corrective maintenance downtime and cost.

Order: #24

24.  Darlow, M. S. and Badgley, R. H. , "Applications for Early Detection of Rolling-Element Bearing Failures using the High-Frequency Resonance Technique, " presented at the ASME Vibrations Conference, Washington, DC, September 1975.

The High-Frequency Resonance Technique (HFRT) has been demonstrated to be a highly sensitive, accurate procedure for the early identification of impending rolling-element bearing failures. This paper presents the theory behind the HFRT, and describes its application to rolling-element bearing defect analysis. Some HFRT tests results are presented and described in order to illustrate both the procedure and the nature of the HFRT data. The HFRT lends itself to both continuous and periodic testing procedures, and thus can be used in a wide range of rolling-element bearing defect identification situations. Several of these situations are discussed herein, but they by no means exhaust the field of possible applications of the HFRT. In addition, it is noted that the HFRT can be usM not only for identification of defects in rolling-element bearings, but also to identify defects in other dynamic machinery elements, such as gears. The HFRT is felt to be an extremely valuable tool with a potential which is only now beginning to be exploited.

» Papers 1-8 | » Papers 9-16 | » Papers 17- 24 | » Papers 25-31 | » Papers 32-43

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